Residence Card

Today I went to the immigration office to exchange my Certificate of Alien Registration for a Residence Card. The system for foreigners resident in Japan changed in July, and everyone needs to change to a Residence Card. They don’t need to do it immediately, but it’s not entirely clear when they should. If you have a limited-term status of residence, it is clear; you will get the Residence Card when you renew or change your status of residence. For permanent residents, however, the deadline is July 8th 2015, or possibly when your Certificate of Alien Registration expires, if that is earlier. The secretariat of the Representative Assembly was told the first, and one of the representatives the second. The secretariat are trying to get an authoritative answer, but in the meantime my Certificate of Alien Registration was getting rather close to expiring, so I decided to get it changed now.

This was remarkably little trouble. You can download the application form, and it’s extremely short and simple; basically just your name, date of birth, sex, address, nationality, and Certificate of Alien Registration number. The form is in English and Japanese, just like all the other immigration forms. You have to attach an ID photo in a standard size and format, and take the form, along with your CAR and passport, to the local immigration office. This is the only possibly bothersome part of the process, as you have to go to the office in person. We happen to live quite close to the office, so it takes me less than an hour door to door, but if you lived on the Ogasawara Islands you would have to get a boat for about 24 hours each way. On the bright side, if you have permanent residence, the Residence Card is valid for seven years, so you don’t have to do it very often.

I was in the office for about half an hour, which included reissuing a revised card because the first version didn’t display my address in exactly the same way as the CAR. I’ve had problems with that in the past; some places are very picky. That means, of course, that some of the picky places have the CAR version, so I want a piece of official ID with the same address on it. The whole process was extremely efficient, and there is no fee.

This is typical of my experiences with Japanese immigration. If you are in the country legally, they seem to be efficient and even helpful. (When I moved during my application for permanent residence, they phoned to check and sent me the form to report my change of address before I’d got round to them on my list of places to notify.) The various procedures also seem to be significantly cheaper than those in other countries. (Free, for example.) Japan might have fairly strict standards for who they will let in, but the immigration office gives the impression that they actually want the people who do meet the standards in the country. Actually, I’ve got that impression from just about everyone.

If you’re a permanent resident of Japan and haven’t changed your card yet, now might be a good time, but the year end rush will start soon. My experience suggests that going at a quiet time will ensure a very quick visit to the office, so I guess that means avoiding year end, the beginning of the academic year in March/April, and the other student visa period in September/October. However, now that re-entry permits are unnecessary, year end and the summer might be quieter than they used to be.

I certainly do not recommend waiting until July 2015. I suspect the offices will be really, really busy then.

The Dalai Lama

The Dalai Lama giving his lectureToday, the Dalai Lama gave a lecture to members of the Japanese Diet, and I was invited to attend. Not, of course, because I’m a member of the Japanese Diet, but one of my students is, and I helped out a little bit with the preparations for the event, so I got an invitation in return. Obviously, this is the sort of invitation you don’t pass up; it’s not an opportunity that comes along very often, even with the Dalai Lama’s energetic schedule of public engagements.

There were 130 or so parliamentarians there, from all parties. The prime minister didn’t attend, because China gets very annoyed when people pay attention to the Dalai Lama, but Shinzo Abe, the leader of the opposition, was there, because he really doesn’t mind annoying China. He spoke briefly at the beginning, and was given a white scarf as a symbol of friendship by the Dalai Lama.

The Dalai Lama spoke in English, with a following translation into Japanese. The interpreter was very good; on a couple of occasions the Dalai Lama spoke for almost ten minutes before letting her translate, but although she got the order of things a bit jumbled a couple of times, she did cover everything he said, and did so accurately. I don’t think she got a script in advance, so it was a very impressive performance. However, I have to say that the Dalai Lama told his own jokes better than she did.

The Dalai Lama started by saying that he thinks of all people as brothers and sisters, and would speak frankly, so he apologised in advance if he went against any local traditions. He mentioned that he has visited Japan a number of times, and has become quite familiar with the culture, and doesn’t really like it when people sit too stiffly and formally while he’s speaking. I still tried not to slouch, though.

His lecture fell into three main parts. First, he spoke as a human being, second as a Buddhist monk, and finally as a Tibetan. Speaking as a human being, he said that he wanted to emphasise that everyone was fundamentally the same, physically and psychologically, and that Tibetans and Japanese, in particular, looked pretty much the same. Everyone, he said, has the right to seek happiness, and we should support them in that. He pointed out that, in the past, there has been a strong barrier between “us” and “them”, and this has led to people trying to defeat “them” in order to secure more for “us”, whether through cheating, bullying, or outright war. However, he believes that in the 21st century we need to dismantle that barrier, and think of everyone as part of a large “us”. We should be working for the happiness of everyone in the world, not just for the betterment of our own group, and part of that is not emphasising the differences between groups.

He said that when we cheat or bully others, we are also hurting ourselves, because human beings are social animals, and always rely on others. In addition, hatred and hostility are physically bad for us, while habitual lying causes great stress. On the other hand, working honestly to benefit others gives rise to self-confidence and inner peace. We all need real friends, artificial ones not so much, and the only way to make them is to behave honestly and transparently, so that we can build trust with them.

Speaking as a Buddhist, he quoted a quantum physicist he met in Argentina, who said it was important for him not to get attached to quantum mechanics. He said that, as a Buddhist, he should also not get attached to Buddhism, because if you do that, you become biased, and unable to understand the other person’s point of view. He pointed out that, although religions claim to teach compassion and forgiveness, they have often been the cause of violence and oppression, a sad state of affairs. Religions, he noted, vary a great deal in their philosophy, some having a creator, while others, like Buddhism, have no creator and instead believe in self-creation. However, he insisted that these differences were good, because people are all different, and no one philosophy can be suitable for all of them. He said that if religions had respect for each other, they could get back to their original purpose of being a force for good in the world.

He went on to say that human beings have a great advantage over other animals: their intelligence. Other animals are controlled by their emotions, but humans do not have to be. They can use their intelligence to override their emotions, and suppress the destructive ones while encouraging compassion and toleration. He said that a lot of the problems with religion arise when people do not properly use their intelligence, and instead rely purely on their emotions.

Finally, he spoke as a Tibetan. His first point was about the ecology of the Tibetan plateau, which a Chinese ecologist has called the “third pole”, in addition to the north and south poles. (That phrase seems to have spread; I’ve seen it several times in Nature.) It is suffering from global warming and deforestation, but that doesn’t just affect the six million Tibetans. Around a billion people in Asia live along rivers that rise in the Tibetan glaciers, although there is no direct connection to any Japanese rivers. Preserving the environment in Tibet is also vital for their life.

Then there is the culture of Tibetan Buddhism. This, again, is not valued only by Tibetans, but also by people around the world, including a large number of Chinese. He stressed that there was no necessary connection between Tibetan Buddhism and separatism, pointing to the example of India, where languages, writing systems, and religions differ greatly across the country, but there is no risk of separatism. If the Tibetans were given the freedom to practise their culture within China, there would be no need for them to leave.

He then excused himself from talking directly about politics, saying that he had retired from politics completely, and that if, after saying that, he went on making comments about it, he would be a hypocrite. Finally, he mentioned that there were a lot of female Diet members in the audience (there were; I think they were probably somewhat over-represented), and commented that this made him very happy. He mentioned that when he visited the European Parliament, there were a lot of female parliamentarians, some of whom were very attractive, and that also made him very happy. (When you’re the Dalai Lama, you can get away with that. Especially when the translator uses a Japanese word that is less directly connected to physical appearance.) His main point, however, was that equality between men and women was an essential part of the modern world, and that he was happy to see that it was recognised in Japan.

There was only time for one question at the end, and one Diet member asked what they could do to help Tibet. The Dalai Lama suggested that they visit Tibet, taking ecologists and journalists with them, to see what was happening. He expressed concern that the central government in China was not receiving accurate reports from regional officials, but that foreign visitors might be able to tell them what was really going on.

The event finished with a declaration of support for Tibetans, and the announcement of the formation of a group of Diet members dedicated to working to support the Tibetans.

After this lecture, I can see why the Dalai Lama has a reputation for wisdom; everything he said struck me as wise (except, possible, the comment about female MEPs). Obviously, in a one hour lecture (half an hour when you factor in the need to translate) he had to leave a lot of the practical problems untouched, but I can’t find anything to disagree with in his general suggestions. It is, of course, refreshing to find a major religious leader stressing that the world needs lots of different religions, but I agree with everything else he said, as well. Does that mean I’m wise? Maybe I have one three hundred millionth of the Dalai Lama’s wisdom just as, as an EU citizen, I have one three hundred millionth of a Nobel Peace Prize.

English Practice

Yesterday at dinner time, Mayuki decided to pretend that I was an American customer who didn’t speak Japanese. She bowed properly to me, and told me about the dinner in English, staying in English when she talked at the table as well. She kept it up for quite a long time before she “went home” and talked to her toys in Japanese about her day.

Obviously, it’s great that Mayuki wants to practise English, but if I have to pretend to be American, I’m not sure about it…

The immediate motivation seems to have come from talking to my father by video chat in the morning. She was explaining, in English, how she wanted to go back to America, and even said, in Japanese, “I have to practise English soon!”. So I think we will have to look into arranging another visit a bit sooner than we originally planned.

Ars Magica Video Game Kickstarter

We (Atlas and I) are working with Black Chicken Studios to produce an Ars Magica video game. (I suspect that Black Chicken will be doing most of the work, being the video game people, but we will have a lot of input as well.) Black Chicken have launched a Kickstarter to fund it. Atlas has a press release about the game and Kickstarter as well.

The target for the Kickstarter is high, because it has been properly budgeted, and $290,000 is actually enough to make sure the game happens. If there isn’t enough interest to pay for the project, we won’t do it, and thus avoid losing $290,000, but we really hope there is enough interest. Is there any interest here?

Mayuki’s Make-up

Yesterday, I got home rather late (the same as tonight), but Mayuki was still awake (the same as tonight). However, yesterday she was sitting quietly in a corner of the living room, doing something. I started to go to see what it was, but she said “Don’t look!”, so I left her alone.

A bit later, she showed us what she had been doing.

She’d given herself nail varnish with a pink felt tip, and eyeshadow with a blue one. She’d done a really good job of it, as well.

Of course, this led to an explanation of the fact that felt tip pens are not good for your skin, and really hurt if they get in your eyes, but Mayuki had managed to do both her upper eyelids without poking herself once. The eyeshadow was well done, as well; we were quite impressed. She probably won’t do it with felt pens again now that we’ve told her it’s dangerous, but we’ll have to look for some children’s eyeshadow for her.

The mystery is why she wants to do this. Yuriko doesn’t use much make-up, and neither do her friends at kindergarten. If nothing else, Mayuki is making it obvious that she is her own person…

Hallowe’en Tree

A Hallowe'en Tree. Like a Christmas Tree, only darker and with more pumpkins.I don’t know. It’s only the middle of September, and the shopping centres already have their Hallowe’en Trees up.

Hang on a minute…

This is the first one I’ve seen in Japan, but for all I know they’re really common.

In other news, I continue to be really busy, which is why there are still very few blog entries from me.

Published in Japanese

Well, it’s been a while since I wrote anything here. I’m not dead; I’m just busy at work, and I’ve managed to sustain daily posts to my Japanese blog, so this one has been a bit (OK, a lot) neglected. I wouldn’t put any money on this post being the start of a trend, either.

The point of this post is to brag.

There is a magazine for English teachers in Japan called 英語教育, which means “English Education”. It has run for years, and apparently can be found in virtually every school in the country. Thanks to an introduction from one of my students, I was asked to write a short article for it, and the article was published in the September issue. It introduces my favourite teaching materials, and I talked about the Guardian Weekly’s Learning English supplement, and the book that the Japan Institute of Logic has coming out from Kenkyusha (a Japanese publisher) later this year. I will be paid a proper rate for this article. (I may in fact have been paid already; I haven’t checked the relevant bank account for a few days.)

The thing that makes this not just another professional publication is the fact that I wrote the article in Japanese. It has been edited, and I need a lot more editing in Japanese than I do in English, but it has not been rewritten or translated. This is my first professional publication in Japanese.

Fortunately, I don’t have to worry about finding my next goal in improving my Japanese. I still need far too much editing.

Annular Eclipse

We saw the annular eclipse this morning. The centre went right over Tokyo, so all we had to do was go outside the flat. Given that, there were surprisingly few people there.

We bought three viewing glasses, so we could all watch together. It’s a bit cloudy, but the clouds were thin, and the clouds over the sun were thin exactly when it was a ring.

It was really, really good.

Obedience

I’m off work with flu today (with a direct instruction not to go in), and after spending the morning in bed I’ve just got up for a bit. I think I might go back to bed fairly soon, though.

But, since I have a bit of time, I want to write a bit about Mayuki.

On Tuesday, Yuriko went to the parent-teacher interview at Mayuki’s kindergarten. I was in work, so I couldn’t go, but that doesn’t seem to have been a problem. Apparently, Mayuki’s teacher started off by saying “I don’t have any concerns, and I don’t really have anything to discuss”. Mayuki is, apparently, enthusiastic about the activities, doesn’t demand the teacher’s attention all the time, does as she is told, and loves pretend play.

And then there was the restaurant visit a little while ago where Mayuki finished up by announcing, “I’ve had enough dessert now. I want more broccoli!”.

Of course, Mayuki isn’t perfect. I’d like her to realise how much it upsets Yuriko when she doesn’t eat the food cooked for her, and participate a bit more enthusiastically in video chats with the rest of my family, but I think those will get better as she gets older.

Talking of eating, there was an incident a little while ago that made me very happy.

Mayuki wanted to eat pancakes for breakfast, and Yuriko was making them. I also wanted to eat breakfast, but Mayuki was sitting in my chair.

“Mayuki, can you move to your chair so I can sit down?”

“But I want to sit here!”

“I can’t sit down if you do.”

“I sat here last time.”

“Daddy wasn’t here then,” Yuriko reminded her.

“You can sit in my chair,” Mayuki suggested.

“No, I can’t. It’s too small. Please move to your chair.”

“No, I want to sit here.”

At this point, the pancake was ready, and got served. Mayuki ate in silence for a little while.

“I’ve just had an idea!” she suddenly said. “Why don’t you bring the chair your students sit on?”

So, we moved Mayuki’s chair out of the way and brought one of the folding chairs I use for my students, and we all ate breakfast at the table.

The reason I was so happy about this was that Mayuki thought about the problem and came up with a solution that got everyone what they wanted. I didn’t particularly want to sit in my chair (I’m a grown adult, I don’t have “special chairs” any more), I just wanted to sit at the table to eat. Mayuki did want to sit in that chair, though, and her solution solved the problem. It also involved thinking about things that were not immediately in front of her, and doing proper problem solving, which is an important skill.

I think this sort of negotiated solution to disagreements is much better than Mayuki simply doing as she is told. It’s a technique that she can use as an adult, and that I can use when she grows up. It also teaches Mayuki to think about what other people want, and how she can make that happen. So, I like the fact that she talks back and makes alternative suggestions.

Basically, I don’t want her to be obedient, I want her to be considerate.

The report from kindergarten is very reassuring in this respect, because it suggests that the way we are raising her is actually working.

Blog Move

I’ve moved my blog from a subdirectory to be the main page of my website. I’ve done this because I only really update the blog these days.

There should be links to all parts of my website in the right-hand sidebar, under the adverts, and any old links to my blog should be automatically redirected to the new location. It seems to be working for now.

All I need now is time to update a bit more.

(We’re all fine.)